Location

Manchester Village, Vermont

Date

27-6-2017

Session

Session 1 — Lectures Medical Issues in Driving

Abstract

Automobile driving requires multiple brain functions. However, the brain regions related to driving behavior are unknown. Therefore, we measured activity of the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes during driving using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Cortical activation patterns were examined in relation to driving behaviors, such as steering motion, accelerator pedal motion, and speed control. Six healthy adults participated in the experiment. Cerebral oxygen exchange (COE) was calculated based on the oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations measured by fNIRS. The COE and driving behavior data were collected every 1 m and averaged for all subjects. Functional NIRS data for all 98 channels were extracted using principal component analysis. Similarity between extracted components and driving behaviors were confirmed by |cosine similarity|>0.3. Among the factors with confirmed similarity, we identified brain regions with high principal component loading (|PCL|>0.4). Among the 16 COE factors extracted, COE factor 1 and factor 5 exhibited similarity with steering motion (cosine similarity: factor 1, -0.538; factor 5, 0.551). The PCLs of COE factor 1 and factor 5 were high in the frontal lobe (Brodmann areas [BAs] 9, 8, and 4/3) (PCL>0.8). COE factor 6 exhibited a similarity with accelerator pedal motion (cosine similarity: 0.369), and the PCL of COE factor 6 was highest in the parietal lobe (BA7) (PCL= -0.62). Speed control did not exhibit similarity with any COE factor. These findings will contribute to the selection of brain measurement areas when fNIRS is used for vehicle driving assessment.

Rights

Copyright © 2017 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Ninth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 26-29, 2017, Manchester Village, Vermont. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2017: 16-22.

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Jun 27th, 12:00 AM

Relationship Between Brain Activity and Real-Road Driving Behavior: A Vector-Based Whole-Brain Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

Manchester Village, Vermont

Automobile driving requires multiple brain functions. However, the brain regions related to driving behavior are unknown. Therefore, we measured activity of the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes during driving using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Cortical activation patterns were examined in relation to driving behaviors, such as steering motion, accelerator pedal motion, and speed control. Six healthy adults participated in the experiment. Cerebral oxygen exchange (COE) was calculated based on the oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations measured by fNIRS. The COE and driving behavior data were collected every 1 m and averaged for all subjects. Functional NIRS data for all 98 channels were extracted using principal component analysis. Similarity between extracted components and driving behaviors were confirmed by |cosine similarity|>0.3. Among the factors with confirmed similarity, we identified brain regions with high principal component loading (|PCL|>0.4). Among the 16 COE factors extracted, COE factor 1 and factor 5 exhibited similarity with steering motion (cosine similarity: factor 1, -0.538; factor 5, 0.551). The PCLs of COE factor 1 and factor 5 were high in the frontal lobe (Brodmann areas [BAs] 9, 8, and 4/3) (PCL>0.8). COE factor 6 exhibited a similarity with accelerator pedal motion (cosine similarity: 0.369), and the PCL of COE factor 6 was highest in the parietal lobe (BA7) (PCL= -0.62). Speed control did not exhibit similarity with any COE factor. These findings will contribute to the selection of brain measurement areas when fNIRS is used for vehicle driving assessment.