Location

Manchester Village, Vermont

Date

29-6-2017

Session

Session 6 — Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Older drivers are frequently involved in collisions at intersections. One reason may be inadequate head and eye scanning when approaching the intersection. Prior driving simulator research on scanning at intersections has employed two main methods to guide subjects through the simulated world: auditory instructions similar to GPS navigation and following a lead vehicle. However, these two methods may have differing effects on head and eye scanning behaviors. We therefore conducted a pilot study to assess the effects of guidance method on participants’ head and eye movements as well as their detection of motorcycle hazards at intersections. Detection rates were significantly higher when following a lead vehicle than when following GPS instructions, but participants were closer to the intersection when they responded. Preliminary examination of the head and eye movement data suggests participants scanned less frequently when following the lead vehicle.

Rights

Copyright © 2017 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Ninth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 26-29, 2017, Manchester Village, Vermont. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2017: 340-346.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

The Effects of Guidance Method on Detection and Scanning at Intersections – A Pilot Study

Manchester Village, Vermont

Older drivers are frequently involved in collisions at intersections. One reason may be inadequate head and eye scanning when approaching the intersection. Prior driving simulator research on scanning at intersections has employed two main methods to guide subjects through the simulated world: auditory instructions similar to GPS navigation and following a lead vehicle. However, these two methods may have differing effects on head and eye scanning behaviors. We therefore conducted a pilot study to assess the effects of guidance method on participants’ head and eye movements as well as their detection of motorcycle hazards at intersections. Detection rates were significantly higher when following a lead vehicle than when following GPS instructions, but participants were closer to the intersection when they responded. Preliminary examination of the head and eye movement data suggests participants scanned less frequently when following the lead vehicle.