Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Degree

Spring 2015

Degree Name

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)

Degree In

Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

First Advisor

Ernest T. Pascarella

Second Advisor

Cassie Barnhardt

Abstract

Colleges and universities continually seek to foster the leadership development of undergraduate students through curricular and co-curricular opportunities and experiences. This study examined the effects and potential contributions of participation in campus-based leadership trainings on college students' leadership development with special consideration for gender and racial background. To better understand the relationship between campus-based trainings and leadership development, data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education (WNS) was utilized. The WNS was a multi-institutional, longitudinal dataset made up of 47 four-year colleges and universities from 21 states throughout the United States. This study mark's one of the first multi-year, multi-institution longitudinal studies to investigate the relationship between campus-based leadership trainings and leadership development.

The results of the study pointed to several over-arching themes. The first theme was that a student's background and leadership experience prior to college matter. Next, a student's curricular success matters, and influences their leadership gains throughout all aspects of the SCM. The interactions students have with peers who are different from themselves matters. Leadership development opportunities need to be intentionally designed. Finally, campus-based leadership trainings offer a potential programmatic option for institutions to help develop their students as socially responsible leaders, regardless of backgrounds and other experiences.

Public Abstract

Colleges and universities continually seek to foster the leadership development of undergraduate students through extra-curricular opportunities and experiences. This study examined the effects and potential contributions of participation in campus-based leadership trainings on college students’ leadership development with special consideration for gender and racial background after four years of undergraduate involvement and education. Most research and existing literature focuses on short-time frames or the first year of college, which can result on a distorted view of how college students, and the nations future leaders truly develop.

The current study utilized a data from a national, multi-year study, the Wabash National Study (WNS). The WNS allowed for a long-term study to investigate the relationship between campus-based leadership trainings and leadership development.

The results of the study pointed to several over-arching themes. The first theme was that a student’s background and leadership experience prior to college matter. Next, a student’s curricular success matters, and influences their leadership gains. The interactions students have with peers from different background matters. Additionally, leadership development opportunities need to be intentionally designed. Finally, campus-based leadership trainings offer a potential programmatic option for institutions to help develop their students as socially responsible leaders, regardless of backgrounds and other experiences.

Keywords

publicabstract, Campus Trainings, College Student, Leadership Developement

Pages

xi, 144

Bibliography

135-144

Copyright

Copyright 2015 Mark Andrew Baccei

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