Document Type

Thesis

Date of Degree

Spring 2015

Access Restrictions

Access restricted until 2018-08-01

Degree Name

MS (Master of Science)

Degree In

Integrative Physiology

First Advisor

Warren Darling

Abstract

Improvements in fatigue and quality of life observed in primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients adhering to a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention (MPDI), nutritional supplementation, exercise, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation regime are hypothesized to be due primarily to the effect of diet. However, no research has been conducted evaluating effects of the dietary intervention alone thus, the purpose of this research was to evaluate a MPDI in the treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS). We tested effects of the MPDI in seventeen men and women (mean age: 36.3 ±4.7 years) with neurologist-verified RRMS. Nine subjects (one male) were randomized to a "usual care" (control) group and eight subjects (one male) were taught the MPDI. Both groups adhered to their assigned protocol for three months.

Significant improvement was seen in Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS, p=0.03), Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Physical Health (MSQOL-P, p=0.03), and Mental Health (MSQOL-M, p=0.02) scores from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls. Increased vitamin K serum levels (p=0.02) were also observed in MPDI subjects at three months compared to controls. Significantly reduced time to complete 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT) with the dominant hand (p=0.02) was also observed. Our results indicate trends for improved non-dominant 9-HPT (p=0.05), Metabolic Equivalent Tasks (METs, p=0.08), and 25-Foot Walk (25-FW, p=0.09) scores from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls.

A Paleolithic diet may be useful in the treatment and management of MS, by reducing perceived fatigue, increasing mental and physical quality of life, increasing exercise capacity, and improving hand and leg function. The MPDI may also reduce inflammation as evidenced by increased vitamin K serum levels.

Public Abstract

Improvements in fatigue and quality of life observed in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients adhering to a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention (MPDI), nutritional supplementation, exercise, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation regime are hypothesized to be due primarily to the effect of diet. However, no research has been conducted evaluating effects of the diet alone. Thus, the purpose of this research was to evaluate a MPDI to treat Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS). We tested effects of the MPDI in women and men (mean age: 36.3 ±4.7 years, 2 men) with neurologist-verified RRMS randomized to MPDI and “usual care” (control) groups. Both groups adhered to their assigned protocol for three months.

Significant improvement was seen in Fatigue Severity Scale (p=0.03), Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Physical Health (p=0.03), and Mental Health (p=0.02) scores from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls. Increased vitamin K serum levels (p=0.02) were also observed in MPDI subjects at three months compared to controls. Significantly reduced time to complete 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT) with the dominant hand (p=0.02) was also observed. Trends were also observed for improved non-dominant 9-HPT (p=0.05), Metabolic Equivalent Tasks (p=0.08), and 25-Foot Walk (p=0.09) scores from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls.

A Paleolithic diet may be useful in the treatment and management of MS, by reducing perceived fatigue, increasing mental and physical quality of life, increasing exercise capacity, and improving hand and leg function. The MPDI may also reduce inflammation as evidenced by increased vitamin K serum levels.

Keywords

publicabstract, fatigue, intervention, Multiple Sclerosis, nutrition, Paleo, quality of life

Pages

ix, 51 pages

Bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 44-51).

Copyright

Copyright 2015 Amanda Kay Irish

Available for download on Wednesday, August 01, 2018

Share

COinS