Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Degree

Spring 2015

Degree Name

DMA (Doctor of Musical Arts)

Degree In

Music

First Advisor

Daniel Moore

Abstract

The combination of solo percussion with live electronics is one of the newest genres of music today. An outgrowth of the instrument and fixed media genre, live electronic music combines a musician on stage performing with a computer or other technology performing real-time processes. This document is a collection of five works scored for percussion and the computer program Max intended for the collegiate level. In addition, there are explanations and schematics of the patches to help the performer learn how to use Max. This document could serve as supplemental material for an undergraduate percussion curriculum to help students gain experience performing with live electronics.

Most students in university music departments are not exposed to technology unless they seek it out themselves. This may cause many student instrumentalists to be hesitant to play works with technology. However, as performing with electronics becomes more common, music students without this experience are at a disadvantage. Basic knowledge of audio equipment, having experience using a microphone, sound recording, and other technical know-how is essential to becoming a successful performer in a contemporary setting. Being able to perform with electronics creates new opportunities for repertoire, collaboration, and performance.

Many universities are starting new programs dedicated to interdisciplinary studies such as digital humanities. These collaborative efforts bring together musicians, dancers, writers, visual artists, computer scientists, and others to create new work. Music students who have some background in performing and working with electronics could be a part of these collaborative efforts and help produce compelling, original work.

Public Abstract

The combination of solo percussion with live electronics is one of the newest genres of music today. An outgrowth of the instrument and fixed media genre, live electronic music combines a musician on stage performing with a computer or other technology performing real-time processes. This document is a collection of five works scored for percussion and the computer program Max intended for the collegiate level. In addition, there are explanations and schematics of the patches to help the performer learn how to use Max. This document could serve as supplemental material for an undergraduate percussion curriculum to help students gain experience performing with live electronics.

Most students in university music departments are not exposed to technology unless they seek it out themselves. This may cause many student instrumentalists to be hesitant to play works with technology. However, as performing with electronics becomes more common, music students without this experience are at a disadvantage. Basic knowledge of audio equipment, having experience using a microphone, sound recording, and other technical know-how is essential to becoming a successful performer in a contemporary setting. Being able to perform with electronics creates new opportunities for repertoire, collaboration, and performance.

Many universities are starting new programs dedicated to interdisciplinary studies such as digital humanities. These collaborative efforts bring together musicians, dancers, writers, visual artists, computer scientists, and others to create new work. Music students who have some background in performing and working with electronics could be a part of these collaborative efforts and help produce compelling, original work.

Keywords

publicabstract, Electronic Music, Live Electroacoustic Music, Max Programming Language, Percussion Music

Pages

vii, 132 pages

Bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 51).

Copyright

Copyright 2015 Andrew Thierauf

Included in

Music Commons

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