Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Degree

Fall 2015

Degree Name

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)

Degree In

Rehabilitation and Counselor Education

First Advisor

Noel Estrada-Hernandez

Abstract

With over 2.3 million individuals in a states, federal prison and/or local jail, the United States has the largest prison population in the world. Ninety-five percent of all offenders incarcerated will return to society at some point in their lives; nevertheless, at least two-third recidivate within three years of their parole/post-release and return to prison. The high volume of offenders contributing to the crime rates, enormous prison growth and the budget needed for correctional operation, has led scholars, policymakers, and correctional officials, in addition to society as a whole, to give great attention in discovering and determining ways to break the repetitive cycle of incarceration and recidivism. Once an offender returns to society after incarceration, they face perplexing challenging barriers, and obstacles that impedes upon their ability to resist crime and complete parole supervision. For African American men, these challenging barriers and obstacles are exacerbated, because of their race and gender. Research shows that African American men are disproportionally represented, among the incarceration rates, prison population and are highly susceptible to factors that lead to recidivism.

The purpose of this study sought to gain more in-depth understanding of former African American male offenders’ experiences and perceptions of resisting crime and completing parole/post-release supervision. In particular, this study used qualitative methods to interview six African American men, in order to determine the significant impact which social and personal factors led them to successful parole/post-release supervision completion. The results of this study indicated that African American male offenders have the ability to complete parole/post-release supervision, when provided the opportunity to gain employment, higher levels of education and vocational training, strong support from their family and friend, establish positive social networks, participate in rehabilitative programs. The research further revealed other contributing factors aids in their success as well.

Public Abstract

With over 2.3 million individuals in a states, federal prison and/or local jail, the United States has the largest prison population in the world. Ninety-five percent of all offenders incarcerated will return to society at some point in their lives; nevertheless, at least two-third recidivate within three years of their parole/post-release and return to prison. The high volume of offenders contributing to the crime rates, enormous prison growth and the budget needed for correctional operation, has led scholars, policymakers, and correctional officials, in addition to society as a whole, to give great attention in discovering and determining ways to break the repetitive cycle of incarceration and recidivism. Once an offender returns to society after incarceration, they face perplexing challenging barriers, and obstacles that impedes upon their ability to resist crime and complete parole supervision. For African American men, these challenging barriers and obstacles are exacerbated, because of their race and gender. Research shows that African American men are disproportionally represented, among the incarceration rates, prison population and are highly susceptible to factors that lead to recidivism.

The purpose of this study sought to gain more in-depth understanding of former African American male offenders’ experiences and perceptions of resisting crime and completing parole/post-release supervision. In particular, this study used qualitative methods to interview six African American men, in order to determine the significant impact of social and personal factors led them to successful parole/post-release supervision completion. The results of this study indicated that African American male offenders have the ability to complete parole/post-release supervision, when provided the opportunity to gain employment, higher levels of education and vocational training, strong support from their family and friend, establish positive social networks, participate in rehabilitative programs. The research further revealed other contributing factors aids in their success as well.

Keywords

publicabstract, African American Males, Crime, Offender, Parole/Post-Release, Resisting, Success

Pages

x, 125 pages

Bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 100-111).

Copyright

Copyright 2015 Frances Ruth Barnes Veale

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