Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Degree

Summer 2016

Degree Name

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)

Degree In

Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

First Advisor

Jodi L. Linley

Second Advisor

Ernest T. Pascarella

Abstract

This three-manuscript formatted dissertation interrogated the effectiveness of high-impact educational practices for marginalized students through the use of critical quantitative inquiry. The first empirical manuscript used data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts education to explore the role of race and class on students’ engagement in and effects from high-impact practices. Findings from this manuscript suggest significant differences in academic motivation change over the first year of college when race and class were examined together, while no differences when just class was examined. The second empirical manuscript used data from the National Study of LGBTQ Student Success to examine the intersections of environment and participation in and effect from high-impact practices for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ+) students. Findings from this manuscript suggested that students’ perceptions of overall support and their relations with instructors mediated the influence that participation in high-impact practices had on students’ academic development. Finally, the third main manuscript considered the utility of critical quantitative inquiry and ways researchers can combine critical theory into quantitative research.

Keywords

college impact, critical quantitative inquiry, higher education, high-impact practices, marginalized student populations

Pages

xiv, 204

Bibliography

204

Copyright

Copyright 2016 Cindy Ann Kilgo

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