Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Degree

Spring 2016

Degree Name

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)

Degree In

Business Administration

First Advisor

Daniel W. Collins

Second Advisor

Cristi A. Gleason

Abstract

In this study, I examine whether the pricing of book-tax differences reflects mispricing or a priced risk factor. I provide new evidence that temporary book-tax differences are mispriced by developing portfolios that trade on the information in book-tax differences for future accruals and cash flows. I develop and test predictions on whether book-tax difference mispricing is the value-glamour anomaly in disguise. Both signals of mispricing relate to firm growth and, thus, both may capture mispricing due to over-extrapolation of realized growth to future growth. I find that the book-tax difference pricing anomaly is subsumed by the value-glamour anomaly. Specifically, trading on the information in book-tax differences does not yield incremental returns relative to a value-glamour trading strategy. Hence, mispricing associated with book-tax differences relates more generally to the mispricing of expected growth as extrapolated from past growth.

Public Abstract

In this study, I examine whether the pricing of book-tax differences reflects mispricing or a priced risk factor. I provide new evidence that temporary book-tax differences are mispriced by developing portfolios that trade on the information in book-tax differences for future accruals and cash flows. I develop and test predictions on whether book-tax difference mispricing is the value-glamour anomaly in disguise. Both signals of mispricing relate to firm growth and, thus, both may capture mispricing due to over-extrapolation of realized growth to future growth. I find that the book-tax difference pricing anomaly is subsumed by the value-glamour anomaly. Specifically, trading on the information in book-tax differences does not yield incremental returns relative to a value-glamour trading strategy. Hence, mispricing associated with book-tax differences relates more generally to the mispricing of expected growth as extrapolated from past growth.

Keywords

publicabstract, asset pricing anomalies, book-tax differences, capital markets, mispricing, value-glamour

Pages

ix, 78 pages

Bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 73-78).

Copyright

Copyright 2016 Bradford Fitzgerald Hepfer

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