Poster Title (Current Submission)

Differences in maternal and paternal responses to prelinguistic vocalizations: implications for communicative development

Major(s)

Psychology

Minor(s)

Religious Studies

Mentor Name

Julie Gros-Louis, Ph.D.

Mentor Department

Psychology

Presentation Date

March 2010

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that contingent nonvocal and vocal responses can influence infants’ prelinguistic vocal production and language development. Few studies have examined paternal responsiveness, although infants are developing in a complex social environment. In this study, we examined maternal and paternal responses to infant attentionally directed vocalizations during 30 min. play sessions. We found that mothers responded more than fathers to vocalizations directed to caregivers and objects. Fathers performed actions more on objects that infants vocalized to than did mothers, whereas fathers and mothers were equally likely to comment on the object. Implications for communicative development are discussed.

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Mar 27th, 12:00 AM

Differences in maternal and paternal responses to prelinguistic vocalizations: implications for communicative development

Recent studies have shown that contingent nonvocal and vocal responses can influence infants’ prelinguistic vocal production and language development. Few studies have examined paternal responsiveness, although infants are developing in a complex social environment. In this study, we examined maternal and paternal responses to infant attentionally directed vocalizations during 30 min. play sessions. We found that mothers responded more than fathers to vocalizations directed to caregivers and objects. Fathers performed actions more on objects that infants vocalized to than did mothers, whereas fathers and mothers were equally likely to comment on the object. Implications for communicative development are discussed.