Poster Title (Current Submission)

The relationship between verb-related omission errors and the use of temporal and non-temporal adverbial clauses in children’s spontaneous language

Major(s)

Communication Sciences & Disorders

Mentor Name

Amanda J. Owen

Mentor Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Presentation Date

March 2010

Abstract

Children are more likely to omit past tense markers in the first clause temporal adverbial sentences (Ernie laughed when Elmo jumped). Owen (in press), following Krantz & Leonard (2007), suggested that these omissions occurred because the adverbial clause indicated temporal information, obviating the need for morphological tense. All utterances containing an adverbial clause and an omission were coded for the clause and error type and location. There were relatively more verb- than noun-related errors in the temporal adverbials but not non-temporal adverbials. Although the locations of the verb errors relative to the adverbial clause differed from chance, this was attributable to non-temporal adverbials.

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Mar 27th, 12:00 AM

The relationship between verb-related omission errors and the use of temporal and non-temporal adverbial clauses in children’s spontaneous language

Children are more likely to omit past tense markers in the first clause temporal adverbial sentences (Ernie laughed when Elmo jumped). Owen (in press), following Krantz & Leonard (2007), suggested that these omissions occurred because the adverbial clause indicated temporal information, obviating the need for morphological tense. All utterances containing an adverbial clause and an omission were coded for the clause and error type and location. There were relatively more verb- than noun-related errors in the temporal adverbials but not non-temporal adverbials. Although the locations of the verb errors relative to the adverbial clause differed from chance, this was attributable to non-temporal adverbials.