Poster Title (Current Submission)

The influence of lower facial projection on the mandibular curve of Spee in hominins and extant humans

Presenter Information

Myra F. LairdFollow

Major(s)

Anthropology, Geoscience

Mentor Name

Robert Franciscus

Mentor Department

Anthropology, Orthodontics

Presentation Date

March 2010

Abstract

The curve of Spee (COS), a concave arc from the mandibular condyles across the tooth occlusal surface, is important in orthodontics, and its presence has been noted in fossil hominins. We tested the hypothesis that COS’s configuration covaries with lower facial projection on a sample of Euro-Americans, African-Americans and hominins (total n=302, CMNH), using 3-D landmarks from the dentition and facial skeleton. Results showed that Euro-Americans exhibit, on average, a more pronounced curve and African-Americans a flatter occlusal surface. Hominins generally extended the variation in the African-American sample.

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Mar 27th, 12:00 AM

The influence of lower facial projection on the mandibular curve of Spee in hominins and extant humans

The curve of Spee (COS), a concave arc from the mandibular condyles across the tooth occlusal surface, is important in orthodontics, and its presence has been noted in fossil hominins. We tested the hypothesis that COS’s configuration covaries with lower facial projection on a sample of Euro-Americans, African-Americans and hominins (total n=302, CMNH), using 3-D landmarks from the dentition and facial skeleton. Results showed that Euro-Americans exhibit, on average, a more pronounced curve and African-Americans a flatter occlusal surface. Hominins generally extended the variation in the African-American sample.