Poster Title (Current Submission)

When in Rome, Reuse as the Romans Do: Moving Statues Around the Ancient Roman Empire

Presenter Information

Lindsay M. MorecraftFollow

Major(s)

Ancient Civilization, Museum Studies

Minor

Music

Mentor Name

Dr. Brenda Longfellow

Mentor Department

Art History

Presentation Date

March 2011

Abstract

Throughout ancient Roman history, there has been literary documentation of statue reuse by prominent Romans, including emperors. Statues were not necessarily reused within their cities of origin, but were sometimes moved to other countries to serve a new purpose. The appeal of this action, especially for emperors, may have been to visually represent Roman dominance over another culture. This reason could also be in combination with legitimizing their connection with an earlier time period and person. Statues were not only moved to represent dominance or to show a past connection. Some statues of emperors who were considered “bad” suffered damnatio memoriae, or condemnation of memory, after death. This action manipulated and possibly erased the memory of his legitimacy and merits. By examining these moved and altered statues in conjunction with their origins and find spots, the appeal and purpose of this action can be better understood.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

When in Rome, Reuse as the Romans Do: Moving Statues Around the Ancient Roman Empire

Throughout ancient Roman history, there has been literary documentation of statue reuse by prominent Romans, including emperors. Statues were not necessarily reused within their cities of origin, but were sometimes moved to other countries to serve a new purpose. The appeal of this action, especially for emperors, may have been to visually represent Roman dominance over another culture. This reason could also be in combination with legitimizing their connection with an earlier time period and person. Statues were not only moved to represent dominance or to show a past connection. Some statues of emperors who were considered “bad” suffered damnatio memoriae, or condemnation of memory, after death. This action manipulated and possibly erased the memory of his legitimacy and merits. By examining these moved and altered statues in conjunction with their origins and find spots, the appeal and purpose of this action can be better understood.