Poster Title (Current Submission)

DeBAFfling Nuclear Organization: A Structure-Function Analysis of a Chromatin Bridging Protein

Major(s)

Biochemistry

Mentor Name

Pamela Geyer

Mentor Department

Biochemistry

Abstract

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My research focuses on proteins that maintain the organization and integrity of the nucleus. A key protein network lies just insides the nucleus, called the nuclear lamina. I investigate interactions between the nuclear lamina and DNA, which is facilitated by Barrier-to-

Autointegration Factor (BAF). BAF is important for cell division,

gene expression and bridging DNA to the nuclear lamina.

Mutations in lamina proteins cause a variety of diseases, collectively called laminopathies. Even though lamina proteins are found in every cell of our bodies, these diseases affect specific tissues that commonly result in muscular dystrophies. The molecular basis for these disease states is still unknown. Through my research, I hope to shed light on the molecular basis in order to facilitate directed treatment.

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DeBAFfling Nuclear Organization: A Structure-Function Analysis of a Chromatin Bridging Protein

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px}

My research focuses on proteins that maintain the organization and integrity of the nucleus. A key protein network lies just insides the nucleus, called the nuclear lamina. I investigate interactions between the nuclear lamina and DNA, which is facilitated by Barrier-to-

Autointegration Factor (BAF). BAF is important for cell division,

gene expression and bridging DNA to the nuclear lamina.

Mutations in lamina proteins cause a variety of diseases, collectively called laminopathies. Even though lamina proteins are found in every cell of our bodies, these diseases affect specific tissues that commonly result in muscular dystrophies. The molecular basis for these disease states is still unknown. Through my research, I hope to shed light on the molecular basis in order to facilitate directed treatment.