Poster Title (Current Submission)

Predictors of Language Outcomes in 3- and 6-year-old children with Mild to Severe Hearing Loss: Data from the OCHL Project

Major(s)

Speech & Hearing Science

Abstract

Approximately 10% of the population in the United States has a hearing impairment of some severity. A hearing loss is difficult for any individual, but especially difficult for young children who are in the process of acquiring language. Whether the language of children with a hearing impairment (HI) eventually approximates that of their normal hearing (NH) peers is unclear. Some studies suggest that these children perform similarly to their NH peers while others suggest they lag behind. Conversational language samples from 90 3- and 6-year-old children from Iowa, Nebraska and North Carolina were analyzed. Data on hearing aid use and benefit was also obtained. HI children performed worse than NH peers in average sentence length and use of grammatical features. Regressions showed that language development is affected by severity of the hearing loss and benefit obtained from hearing aid use. Implications for early identification and aural habilitation will be discussed.

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Predictors of Language Outcomes in 3- and 6-year-old children with Mild to Severe Hearing Loss: Data from the OCHL Project

Approximately 10% of the population in the United States has a hearing impairment of some severity. A hearing loss is difficult for any individual, but especially difficult for young children who are in the process of acquiring language. Whether the language of children with a hearing impairment (HI) eventually approximates that of their normal hearing (NH) peers is unclear. Some studies suggest that these children perform similarly to their NH peers while others suggest they lag behind. Conversational language samples from 90 3- and 6-year-old children from Iowa, Nebraska and North Carolina were analyzed. Data on hearing aid use and benefit was also obtained. HI children performed worse than NH peers in average sentence length and use of grammatical features. Regressions showed that language development is affected by severity of the hearing loss and benefit obtained from hearing aid use. Implications for early identification and aural habilitation will be discussed.