Title

Defining and managing family caregiving in chronic illness: expectations, explanations, and strategies

Document Type

Dissertation

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

1-1-1998

Journal, Book or Conference Title

Defining and managing family caregiving in chronic illness: expectations, explanations, and strategies

Abstract

Study findings identified the process by which caregivers made meaning out of their situations. This process was called the caregiving hermeneutic and consisted of the expectations, explanations, and strategies caregivers used in interpreting caregiving. The study also identified the kinds of meaning caregivers made out of their situations. The resulting four kinds of meaning were called metanarrative types. Metanarrative types consisted of stories of ideal lives, stories of ordinary lives, stories of compromised lives, and stories that were ambiguous. Caregivers who told compromised stories scored higher on measures of tension and depression and lower on measures of esteem for caregiving than tellers of ordinary stories.

Keywords

Caregivers -- Psychosocial Factors, Chronic Disease -- Psychosocial Factors, Family -- Psychosocial Factors, Blacks, Clinical Assessment Tools, Female, Male, Narratives, Phenomenological Research, Scales, Semi-Structured Interview, Thematic Analysis, Whites, Human

Comments

PH D Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Sciences Center, 1998

Published Article/Book Citation

The definitive version was published in Defining and managing family caregiving in chronic illness: expectations, explanations, and strategies, : (1998) pp.1-300.

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URL

http://ir.uiowa.edu/nursing_pubs/144