Title

Experiential Narratives of Rape and Torture

Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

3-1-2010

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Religious Ethics

DOI of Published Version

10.1111/j.1467-9795.2009.00414.x

Abstract

Many Guatemalan women suffered extreme sexual violence during the latter half of the twentieth century. Learning of this violence can evoke hatred in persons who love and respect women—hatred for the men who perpetrated the violence and also for other men around the world who victimize women in this way. Hatred is a common response to a perceived evil, and it might in some cases be a fitting response, but it is important to subject one's emotions to critical moral reflection. A key task of ethics is to encourage persons to cultivate good habits of being moved. This essay analyzes the way in which two different texts manage, through the skillful presentation of experiential narratives, to help readers acknowledge the hatred they might feel, but also to think twice about the hatred to which they consent. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; Copyright of Journal of Religious Ethics is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Keywords

Sustainability

Published Article/Book Citation

Journal of Religious Ethics, 38:1 (2010) pp.43-66.

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URL

http://ir.uiowa.edu/religion_pubs/8