Discussants

Douglas M. Gibler, University of Alabama and Michaela C. Mattes, Vanderbilt University

Start Date

10-13-2006 11:00 AM

End Date

10-13-2006 12:00 PM

Abstract

Paper presented at the 2006 Shambaugh Conference "Building Synergies: Institutions and Cooperation in World Politics," University of Iowa, 13 October 2006. Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Peace Science Society (International), Ann Arbor, November 2003, and the 45th Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association, Montreal, March 2004. The authors wish to thank Ashley Leeds, Bumba Mukherjee, Chris Reenock, and Jeff Staton for their valuable comments and suggestions, while taking full blame for all errors and interpretations herein.

Abstract

A recent article suggests that a norm of territorial integrity spread rapidly across the globe during the twentieth century. While the successful acquisition of territory by force has become much less frequent, though, there have been numerous attempts to acquire territory by force during this time, and there appear to be several different types of obligations in territorial integrity treaties. Drawing from the content of treaties with territorial integrity provisions, we reconceptualize the norm to distinguish between treaties guaranteeing territorial integrity in a general sense and those that only proscribe the acquisition of territory by force, and we examine an important precursor in the nineteenth-century Latin American norm of uti possidetis juris. We find that both norms seem to have been associated with generally increased low-level conflict over territory but (at least for general territorial integrity obligations and for the Latin American states that developed uti possidetis) less of the more intense forms of conflict.

Rights

Copyright © Paul R. Hensel, Michael E. Allison and Ahmed Khanani, 2006.

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Oct 13th, 11:00 AM Oct 13th, 12:00 PM

Territorial Integrity Treaties, Uti Possidetis, and Armed Conflict over Territory

Paper presented at the 2006 Shambaugh Conference "Building Synergies: Institutions and Cooperation in World Politics," University of Iowa, 13 October 2006. Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Peace Science Society (International), Ann Arbor, November 2003, and the 45th Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association, Montreal, March 2004. The authors wish to thank Ashley Leeds, Bumba Mukherjee, Chris Reenock, and Jeff Staton for their valuable comments and suggestions, while taking full blame for all errors and interpretations herein.

Abstract

A recent article suggests that a norm of territorial integrity spread rapidly across the globe during the twentieth century. While the successful acquisition of territory by force has become much less frequent, though, there have been numerous attempts to acquire territory by force during this time, and there appear to be several different types of obligations in territorial integrity treaties. Drawing from the content of treaties with territorial integrity provisions, we reconceptualize the norm to distinguish between treaties guaranteeing territorial integrity in a general sense and those that only proscribe the acquisition of territory by force, and we examine an important precursor in the nineteenth-century Latin American norm of uti possidetis juris. We find that both norms seem to have been associated with generally increased low-level conflict over territory but (at least for general territorial integrity obligations and for the Latin American states that developed uti possidetis) less of the more intense forms of conflict.