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Peer Reviewed

1

Abstract

Examines Whitman's relationship to nineteenth-century Anglo-Saxonism (as seen in such periodicals as The Anglo-Saxon) and proposes that "his vocabulary of Anglo-Saxonism problematizes his call for equality and universality," producing tensions in his work--"his changing focus from language to racial superiority and then to the postbellum negation of that superiority demonstrates the complexity of Whitman's politics"-and leading him after 1860 to employ "both new vocabulary and new ideas which actively contradict the familiar strains of Anglo-Saxonism."

Rights

Copyright © 2006 Heidi Kathleen Kim

DOI

10.13008/2153-3695.1805

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