Type of Program

Speech/Presentation/Lecture

Start Date

April 2010

Program Topic Category

Collection building

Description

Conference attendees will learn how the gap between research universities and public libraries has been bridged in Huntsville, Alabama and how CONTENTdm is at the heart of combining public history with display and preservation. In 1988, researchers began compiling interviews with people who either worked in Huntsville’s textile mills or had a direct connection to the mill villages. From these interviews, 55 tapes were produced and turned over to the Huntsville-Madison County Public Library. Over the years, as mill histories have been increasingly in demand, researchers have sporadically mined these tapes to give life, voice, and individuality to historical monographs, journal articles, and papers. The advent of CONTENTdm and AlabamaMosaic (Alabama’s statewide digital repository) has provided the vehicle for these interviews to be transcribed, digitized, and shared with the public. The archives department of the Huntsville-Madison County Public Library is partnering with the history department of the University of Alabama-Huntsville to transcribe these tapes, along with other oral histories, and to make them available on AlabamaMosaic. The digitization of oral history in Alabama has been embraced by academic libraries, public libraries, and archives, as evidenced by the University of Alabama-Birmingham‘s extensive digitized oral history project and the inclusion of oral history videos in digital collections from the Alabama Department of Archives & History. This example of municipal and statewide partnership should be of interest to attendees who are trying to promote collaboration among different types of institutions.

Rights

Copyright © 2010 Betty S. Leberman

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Apr 9th, 12:00 AM

Oral History with CONTENTdm: A Public Library-University Partnership

Conference attendees will learn how the gap between research universities and public libraries has been bridged in Huntsville, Alabama and how CONTENTdm is at the heart of combining public history with display and preservation. In 1988, researchers began compiling interviews with people who either worked in Huntsville’s textile mills or had a direct connection to the mill villages. From these interviews, 55 tapes were produced and turned over to the Huntsville-Madison County Public Library. Over the years, as mill histories have been increasingly in demand, researchers have sporadically mined these tapes to give life, voice, and individuality to historical monographs, journal articles, and papers. The advent of CONTENTdm and AlabamaMosaic (Alabama’s statewide digital repository) has provided the vehicle for these interviews to be transcribed, digitized, and shared with the public. The archives department of the Huntsville-Madison County Public Library is partnering with the history department of the University of Alabama-Huntsville to transcribe these tapes, along with other oral histories, and to make them available on AlabamaMosaic. The digitization of oral history in Alabama has been embraced by academic libraries, public libraries, and archives, as evidenced by the University of Alabama-Birmingham‘s extensive digitized oral history project and the inclusion of oral history videos in digital collections from the Alabama Department of Archives & History. This example of municipal and statewide partnership should be of interest to attendees who are trying to promote collaboration among different types of institutions.