Title

A model for the effect of rhizodeposition on the fate of phenanthrene in aged contaminated soil

Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

2005

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Environmental Science and Technology

DOI of Published Version

10.1021/es0506861

Start Page

9669

Abstract

Microcosm data were used to develop a deterministic model to describe how rhizodeposition affects the fate of phenanthrene in aged contaminated soil. Microbial mineralization and soil sequestration of 14C-phenanthrene were compared in microcosms amended weekly with phenolic-rich mulberry root extracts versus unamended controls. Mineralization was higher in the amended soils simulating the rhizosphere (57.7 ± 0.9%) than in controls simulating bulk (unplanted) soils (53.2 ± 0.7%) after 201 days (p C-phenanthrene were compared in microcosms amended weekly with phenolic-rich mulberry root extracts versus unamended controls. Mineralization was higher in the amended soils simulating the rhizosphere (57.7 ± 0.9%) than in controls simulating bulk (unplanted) soils (53.2 ± 0.7%) after 201 days (p 14C-label. Whereas the total 14C-label associated with humin remained Constantin biologically active soils (at about 30%), it increased up to 80% after 201 days in sterile controls. The initial phenanthrene extraction with n-butanol (commonly used to assess bioavailability) slightly underestimated the fraction that was mineralized (assessed by 14CO2 recovery). Changes in the unextractable fraction (determined by combustion in a biological oxidizer) suggested the presence of two soil sequestration domains: (1) irreversibly bound residue, and (2) an intermediate transition phase that is unextractable by solvents at a given point in time but could become bioavailable due to physicochemical or biological transformations of the binding matrix. The fate of phenanthrene was accurately modeled by considering the transfer of the 14C label between different soil compartments as first-order kinetic processes. Model simulations suggested that the system was approaching a stable end-point after 201 days of simulated rhizoremediation, and corroborated that microorganisms have a significant impact on the fate of phenanthrene in soil. © 2005 American Chemical Society.

Published Article/Book Citation

Environmental Science and Technology, 39:24 (2005) pp.9669

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URL

https://ir.uiowa.edu/cee_pubs/192