DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1675

Location

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Date

25-6-2019

Session

Session 2 – Vulnerable Road Users

Abstract

Crosswalks are designed to enhance pedestrian visibility and right-ofway. This study examines driver performance at two different crosswalks with different pedestrian signal designs: (1) Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFBs) and (2) Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHB). Mixed effects linear models showed that the drivers’ speed significantly decreased when a signal was activated, with a larger decrease observed at a PHB signal when there was no lead vehicle. Mixed effects logistic models showed that drivers’ likelihood to change distracting status was higher when a pedestrian signal was activated. The change could occur in both directions: from being engaged to not and from not engaged to distracted. Males and females responded differently to the RRFB in terms of speed differential and likelihood to engage in distractions from an undistracted state. In summary, PHB was able to decrease driver speed more effectively, while RRFB appeared to promote less travel delays for drivers.

Rights

Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Tenth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 24-27 June 2019, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2019: 57-63.

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

The Impact of Crosswalk Design on Driver Performance: Implications for Pedestrian Safety

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Crosswalks are designed to enhance pedestrian visibility and right-ofway. This study examines driver performance at two different crosswalks with different pedestrian signal designs: (1) Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFBs) and (2) Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHB). Mixed effects linear models showed that the drivers’ speed significantly decreased when a signal was activated, with a larger decrease observed at a PHB signal when there was no lead vehicle. Mixed effects logistic models showed that drivers’ likelihood to change distracting status was higher when a pedestrian signal was activated. The change could occur in both directions: from being engaged to not and from not engaged to distracted. Males and females responded differently to the RRFB in terms of speed differential and likelihood to engage in distractions from an undistracted state. In summary, PHB was able to decrease driver speed more effectively, while RRFB appeared to promote less travel delays for drivers.