DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1685

Location

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Date

25-6-2019

Session

Session 3 - Poster Session A

Abstract

This research explores a novel approach to measuring driver anger using facial electromyography (EMG) while completing a navigation task on a driving simulator. Participants’ anger was induced by traffic events that were frustrating in nature as well as time pressure while having to follow navigational directions. Participants’ feeling of anger was assessed multiple times via subjective self-reports while being continuously monitored through a facial EMG. Participants’ trait driving anger was assessed using the Driving Anger Scale. Results showed that, compared to baseline measures, participants had significantly higher facial EMG activation values and subjective feelings of anger upon experiencing frustrating events, suggesting facial EMG as a reliable physiological measurement for inferring drivers’ feelings of anger. This experimental protocol can be used to assess anger in navigational contexts in future studies.

Rights

Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Tenth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 24-27 June 2019, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2019: 126-132.

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

An Investigation of Measuring Driver Anger with Electromyography

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

This research explores a novel approach to measuring driver anger using facial electromyography (EMG) while completing a navigation task on a driving simulator. Participants’ anger was induced by traffic events that were frustrating in nature as well as time pressure while having to follow navigational directions. Participants’ feeling of anger was assessed multiple times via subjective self-reports while being continuously monitored through a facial EMG. Participants’ trait driving anger was assessed using the Driving Anger Scale. Results showed that, compared to baseline measures, participants had significantly higher facial EMG activation values and subjective feelings of anger upon experiencing frustrating events, suggesting facial EMG as a reliable physiological measurement for inferring drivers’ feelings of anger. This experimental protocol can be used to assess anger in navigational contexts in future studies.