DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1709

Location

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Date

26-6-2019

Session

Session 6 - Poster Session B

Abstract

Driver distraction is thought to play a causal role in automobile crashes. Younger and older drivers have the highest crash risk per mile driven. To get a better understanding of the risk associated with conducting secondary tasks while driving the Naturalistic Driving Study (NDS) dataset, part of the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP2) was used to run a log-linear model comparing age and secondary task involvement and their relation to Event Severity (Balanced Baseline vs Crash), as well as Maneuver Judgement (Safe vs Unsafe). A significant relationship was found between event severity and maneuver judgement. Additionally, age group and secondary task engagement had a significant effect on event severity, but no significant interaction between age and secondary task was found. Age had a significant effect on maneuver judgement, but secondary task did not. Therefore, maneuver judgement may not be a good substitute for event severity as an outcome variable for predicting crashes.

Rights

Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Tenth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 24-27 June 2019, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2019: 294-300.

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Jun 26th, 12:00 AM

Age and Secondary Task Engagement in Relation to Safe/Unsafe Driving Behavior and Crash/Non-Crash Events

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Driver distraction is thought to play a causal role in automobile crashes. Younger and older drivers have the highest crash risk per mile driven. To get a better understanding of the risk associated with conducting secondary tasks while driving the Naturalistic Driving Study (NDS) dataset, part of the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP2) was used to run a log-linear model comparing age and secondary task involvement and their relation to Event Severity (Balanced Baseline vs Crash), as well as Maneuver Judgement (Safe vs Unsafe). A significant relationship was found between event severity and maneuver judgement. Additionally, age group and secondary task engagement had a significant effect on event severity, but no significant interaction between age and secondary task was found. Age had a significant effect on maneuver judgement, but secondary task did not. Therefore, maneuver judgement may not be a good substitute for event severity as an outcome variable for predicting crashes.