DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1713

Location

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Date

27-6-2019

Session

Session 7 – Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Driving with foresight is essential for road safety. Anticipating upcoming events and intended maneuvers of other traffic participants requires the perception and processing of meaningful and valid cues. To provide insights into the cognitive mechanisms of anticipation, we investigated the effect of cognitive load, experience and cue characteristic on the anticipation of upcoming lane changes in urban driving scenarios. A two-step reaction method gathered low and high certainty anticipatory reactions of student and ambulance drivers. Results indicated that different anticipatory cues affected anticipatory performance. Target cues highly associated with the intended behavior of another traffic participant increased while context cues in the surrounding environment seemed to hamper anticipatory reactions. Furthermore, high cognitive load prolonged the latencies of low certainty anticipation but did not affect the performance quality. This initial intuition of an upcoming lane change was indicated earlier by experienced than by inexperienced drivers. These findings enhance the understanding of the human process of anticipation in dynamic uncritical traffic situations.

Rights

Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Tenth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 24-27 June 2019, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2019: 321-327.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 27th, 12:00 AM

Driving with Foresight - Evaluating the Effect of Cognitive Distraction and Experience on Anticipating Events in Traffic

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Driving with foresight is essential for road safety. Anticipating upcoming events and intended maneuvers of other traffic participants requires the perception and processing of meaningful and valid cues. To provide insights into the cognitive mechanisms of anticipation, we investigated the effect of cognitive load, experience and cue characteristic on the anticipation of upcoming lane changes in urban driving scenarios. A two-step reaction method gathered low and high certainty anticipatory reactions of student and ambulance drivers. Results indicated that different anticipatory cues affected anticipatory performance. Target cues highly associated with the intended behavior of another traffic participant increased while context cues in the surrounding environment seemed to hamper anticipatory reactions. Furthermore, high cognitive load prolonged the latencies of low certainty anticipation but did not affect the performance quality. This initial intuition of an upcoming lane change was indicated earlier by experienced than by inexperienced drivers. These findings enhance the understanding of the human process of anticipation in dynamic uncritical traffic situations.