Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

8-4-2016

NLM Title Abbreviation

Philos Ethics Humanit Med

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine

PubMed ID

27491390

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/s13010-016-0038-0

Abstract

It is almost universally accepted that traditional provider-patient relationships should be governed, at least in part, by the ethical principles set forth by Beauchamp and Childress (Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of biomedical ethics, 1979). These principles include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice (Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of biomedical ethics, 1979). Recently, however, the nature of medial practice has changed. The pervasive presence of computer technology in medicine raises interesting ethical questions. In this paper we argue that some software designers should be considered health care providers and thus be subject the ethical principles incumbent upon "traditional" providers. We argue that these ethical responsibilities should be applied explicitly rather than as a passive, implicit, set of guidelines.

Keywords

OAfund

Journal Article Version

Version of Record

Published Article/Book Citation

Graber and Bailey Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine (2016) 11:4 DOI 10.1186/s13010-016-0038-0

Rights

© Graber and Bailey. 2016

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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URL

https://ir.uiowa.edu/emergencymedicine_pubs/1