Major(s)

Sociology

Minor(s)

Psychology, Spanish

Mentor Name

Mary E. Campbell

Mentor Department

Sociology

Presentation Date

3-25-2010

Abstract

Polychronicity, or the preference for doing more than one thing at a time, has become a prominent aspect of contemporary life since the advent of technological advancement. Related temporal phenomena, most notably media-multitasking, are largely unstudied and misunderstood. Two conceptual models, a Temporal Imagination Model as well as the Polychronic Context Continuum, are presented and elaborated for integration into future research regarding multitasking and polychronicity. This research explains considerable differences both inter- and intra-generationally on a multitude of personality and social variables. Using a diverse sample of 1,319 participants, the study analyzes nine variables related to media-multitasking preferences and time practices. Results of this study demonstrate those with fewer social limitations (i.e. those living alone or with less social responsibility) are more likely to multitask. Those who spent more hours on the internet, playing video games, and listening to music also showed significant relations with elevated multitasking. Additionally, in regards to current societal worries about the social fragmentation facing children and heavy technology users, results demonstrated that participants preferred face-to-face interaction over any alternative social interactive technology method in informal networks, where preferences throughout formal networks were largely role dependent.

Rights

Copyright © 2010 Brandon L Kramer

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Mar 25th, 12:00 AM

Polychronic Technology Usage: Understanding Intra/Intergenerational Variation of Multitasking in Diverse Groups

Polychronicity, or the preference for doing more than one thing at a time, has become a prominent aspect of contemporary life since the advent of technological advancement. Related temporal phenomena, most notably media-multitasking, are largely unstudied and misunderstood. Two conceptual models, a Temporal Imagination Model as well as the Polychronic Context Continuum, are presented and elaborated for integration into future research regarding multitasking and polychronicity. This research explains considerable differences both inter- and intra-generationally on a multitude of personality and social variables. Using a diverse sample of 1,319 participants, the study analyzes nine variables related to media-multitasking preferences and time practices. Results of this study demonstrate those with fewer social limitations (i.e. those living alone or with less social responsibility) are more likely to multitask. Those who spent more hours on the internet, playing video games, and listening to music also showed significant relations with elevated multitasking. Additionally, in regards to current societal worries about the social fragmentation facing children and heavy technology users, results demonstrated that participants preferred face-to-face interaction over any alternative social interactive technology method in informal networks, where preferences throughout formal networks were largely role dependent.