Poster Title (Current Submission)

Zooarchaeological Analysis of Animal Remains from the Scott County Pueblo, Kansas

Major(s)

Anthropology, Biology

Mentor Name

Matthew E. Hill

Mentor Department

Anthropology

Presentation Date

3-25-2010

Abstract

Scott County Pueblo is a 700 year old Native American archeological site in western Kansas. The site is unique, being the easternmost site of its kind known in North America. This project examines hunting and butchery strategies used by the site’s inhabitants to acquire and consume animals such as white-tailed and mule deer, antelope and elk. Detailed analysis was performed on over 600 bones and fragments. This analysis included making identifications as to the species represented, and the age and number of animals present. This project characterized the damage to the assemblage caused by natural weathering, breakage patterns, and the presence and type of humanly produced butchery marks. Classification and statistical analysis of these details about the animal’s remains provides a greater knowledge base from which we may understand the subsistence strategies and life ways of the Puebloan peoples which inhabited the site. In addition, these results may inform on how important hunting was to the diet of the site’s occupants, who mostly made their living though farming corn.

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Mar 25th, 12:00 AM

Zooarchaeological Analysis of Animal Remains from the Scott County Pueblo, Kansas

Scott County Pueblo is a 700 year old Native American archeological site in western Kansas. The site is unique, being the easternmost site of its kind known in North America. This project examines hunting and butchery strategies used by the site’s inhabitants to acquire and consume animals such as white-tailed and mule deer, antelope and elk. Detailed analysis was performed on over 600 bones and fragments. This analysis included making identifications as to the species represented, and the age and number of animals present. This project characterized the damage to the assemblage caused by natural weathering, breakage patterns, and the presence and type of humanly produced butchery marks. Classification and statistical analysis of these details about the animal’s remains provides a greater knowledge base from which we may understand the subsistence strategies and life ways of the Puebloan peoples which inhabited the site. In addition, these results may inform on how important hunting was to the diet of the site’s occupants, who mostly made their living though farming corn.