Poster Title (Current Submission)

Is Personality in the Eye of the Beholder? Discrepancies Between Self-reported and Objective Ratings of Adaptive and Maladaptive Personality Traits

Major(s)

Economics, Psychology

Minor(s)

Spanish

Mentor Department

Psychology

Presentation Date

3-25-2010

Abstract

Current personality measures rely heavily on self-report, which are necessarily subjective, that is, based on individuals’ self-views. This study uses a new measure—the Schedule for Personality Assessment from Notes and Documents (SPAN-DOC)—to investigate whether 26 personality traits (e.g., mistrustfulness, impulsivity) can be assessed reliably from information in psychological-clinic clients’ files, such as clinicians’ reports of clients’ intake interview, and how much SPAN-DOC ratings agree with clients’ self-rated personality test scores. The study also examines how traits that SPAN-DOC measures are interrelated.

Differences between self- and other-report previously have been found for the broad trait of Disinhibition, which encompasses whether people are carefree and spontaneous, act impulsively, and are easily distracted, or are more planful and focused on specific goals, so this study highlights Disinhibition. Study findings may help to improve the validity of personality assessment in clinical settings.

This project provides data of use in the ongoing revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. Specifically, the study’s findings will increase understanding of how best to assess personality trait dimensions, which are important in diagnosing personality disorder. This will improve the validity of personality assessment in clinical settings and help clients understand their own personalities better.

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Mar 25th, 12:00 AM

Is Personality in the Eye of the Beholder? Discrepancies Between Self-reported and Objective Ratings of Adaptive and Maladaptive Personality Traits

Current personality measures rely heavily on self-report, which are necessarily subjective, that is, based on individuals’ self-views. This study uses a new measure—the Schedule for Personality Assessment from Notes and Documents (SPAN-DOC)—to investigate whether 26 personality traits (e.g., mistrustfulness, impulsivity) can be assessed reliably from information in psychological-clinic clients’ files, such as clinicians’ reports of clients’ intake interview, and how much SPAN-DOC ratings agree with clients’ self-rated personality test scores. The study also examines how traits that SPAN-DOC measures are interrelated.

Differences between self- and other-report previously have been found for the broad trait of Disinhibition, which encompasses whether people are carefree and spontaneous, act impulsively, and are easily distracted, or are more planful and focused on specific goals, so this study highlights Disinhibition. Study findings may help to improve the validity of personality assessment in clinical settings.

This project provides data of use in the ongoing revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. Specifically, the study’s findings will increase understanding of how best to assess personality trait dimensions, which are important in diagnosing personality disorder. This will improve the validity of personality assessment in clinical settings and help clients understand their own personalities better.