Major(s)

Chemistry

Mentor Name

Leonard MacGillivray

Mentor Department

Chemistry

Presentation Date

3-25-2010

Abstract

Materials that consist of semiconductors surround us – a well-known example being the silicon chips in computers. A new form of semiconductor is based on flexible materials in the form of organic molecules. Organic semiconductors offer the promise of low cost, flexible electronics. Electronic paper, electronic clothes, flexible solar energy storage devices are all possibilities. The current semiconductor industry is in excess of $1 trillion. Organic semiconductors will expand this industry considerably, having broad applications. At the University of Iowa, we are working to develop a method to optimize how electric charge runs through organic semiconductor materials. We develop solids known as co-crystals that allow us to place the organic molecules responsible for the movement of electric charge into tailored geometries. More specifically, we use small organic molecules to assemble and preorganize organic semiconductor molecules into geometries most favorable for charge movement. The latest developments of our work will be described.

Rights

Copyright © 2010 Kristin M Kester

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Mar 25th, 12:00 AM

Co-crystallization of Thiophene-based Semiconductors with Carboxylic Acids and Effects on Crystal Packing

Materials that consist of semiconductors surround us – a well-known example being the silicon chips in computers. A new form of semiconductor is based on flexible materials in the form of organic molecules. Organic semiconductors offer the promise of low cost, flexible electronics. Electronic paper, electronic clothes, flexible solar energy storage devices are all possibilities. The current semiconductor industry is in excess of $1 trillion. Organic semiconductors will expand this industry considerably, having broad applications. At the University of Iowa, we are working to develop a method to optimize how electric charge runs through organic semiconductor materials. We develop solids known as co-crystals that allow us to place the organic molecules responsible for the movement of electric charge into tailored geometries. More specifically, we use small organic molecules to assemble and preorganize organic semiconductor molecules into geometries most favorable for charge movement. The latest developments of our work will be described.