Major(s)

International Studies, Political Science, Religious Studies

Minor(s)

Spanish

Mentor Name

Keen, Ralph

Mentor Department

Religious Studies

Presentation Date

3-25-2010

Abstract

The Zulu have often been called “the proudest people in Africa” because of how they carry themselves and their cultural symbols. This project looks at how the strong Zulu nationalism that arose among the Zulu during the colonial and Apartheid eras has been carried over into democratic South Africa. This is achieved by taking a look at the Nazareth Baptist Church (founded in 1910 by Isaiah Shembe). The Nazareth Baptist Church is a mixture of traditional Zulu practices and Christianity to create a unique religious movement. Based on a literature review, participant observation, and subject interview during the July Holy Month Festival in the Nazareth holy city of Ebuhleni, this research discusses to what extent Zulu nationalism is ingrained into the Church. Furthermore, it looks at how Shembe has created a new primary identity for its followers through ceremony and law.

Rights

Copyright © 2010 Brian M Buh

Comments

Major: International Studies, Political Science, Religious Studies. Minor: Spanish. Also presented at SURF 2010 (Spring Undergraduate Research Festival)

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Mar 25th, 12:00 AM

A Mixture of Identities: A Look at Zulu Nationalism in the Nazareth Baptist Church

Iowa City, Iowa

The Zulu have often been called “the proudest people in Africa” because of how they carry themselves and their cultural symbols. This project looks at how the strong Zulu nationalism that arose among the Zulu during the colonial and Apartheid eras has been carried over into democratic South Africa. This is achieved by taking a look at the Nazareth Baptist Church (founded in 1910 by Isaiah Shembe). The Nazareth Baptist Church is a mixture of traditional Zulu practices and Christianity to create a unique religious movement. Based on a literature review, participant observation, and subject interview during the July Holy Month Festival in the Nazareth holy city of Ebuhleni, this research discusses to what extent Zulu nationalism is ingrained into the Church. Furthermore, it looks at how Shembe has created a new primary identity for its followers through ceremony and law.