Major(s)

Biology, Religious Studies

Mentor Name

Dawn Quelle

Mentor Department

Pharmacology

Presentation Date

3-22-2011

Abstract

The Arf-Mdm2-p53 is a critical tumor suppressor pathway that is lost in many cancers. A novel protein known as NIAM (Nuclear Interactor of Arf and Mdm2) has functions both dependent and independent of the Arf-Mdm2-p53 pathway. NIAM functions to inhibit chromosomal instability and cell proliferation, both common characteristics of cancers, perhaps indicating a role as a novel tumor suppressor. NIAM contains FYRN/FYRC domains found in many chromatin-associated proteins. The corresponding protein found in Drosophila, dNIAM, also retains FYRN/FYRC domains, which we predict associate with chromatin similarly to the mammalian form. Objectives were to investigate whether NIAM is a chromatin associated protein in flies and determine the biological role of dNIAM in Drosophila melanogaster. When expressed in flies, dNIAM localized to chromosomes at decondensed regions, consistent with a role in chromatin regulation. Understanding the functions and mechanisms involving the protein, NIAM, may provide future avenues for cancer research and treatment.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 Katie Thies

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Mar 22nd, 12:00 AM

In vivo expression and analysis of a novel protein, NIAM, in Drosophila melanogaster

The Arf-Mdm2-p53 is a critical tumor suppressor pathway that is lost in many cancers. A novel protein known as NIAM (Nuclear Interactor of Arf and Mdm2) has functions both dependent and independent of the Arf-Mdm2-p53 pathway. NIAM functions to inhibit chromosomal instability and cell proliferation, both common characteristics of cancers, perhaps indicating a role as a novel tumor suppressor. NIAM contains FYRN/FYRC domains found in many chromatin-associated proteins. The corresponding protein found in Drosophila, dNIAM, also retains FYRN/FYRC domains, which we predict associate with chromatin similarly to the mammalian form. Objectives were to investigate whether NIAM is a chromatin associated protein in flies and determine the biological role of dNIAM in Drosophila melanogaster. When expressed in flies, dNIAM localized to chromosomes at decondensed regions, consistent with a role in chromatin regulation. Understanding the functions and mechanisms involving the protein, NIAM, may provide future avenues for cancer research and treatment.