Poster Title (Current Submission)

Neutrophil Activation During Bacterial Sepsis: A Finely Regulated Process

Major(s)

Integrative Physiology

Minor

Music

Mentor Name

Jessica G. Moreland

Other Mentor Department

Pediatrics

Presentation Date

3-22-2011

Abstract

Septicemia, a whole-body infection, is among the top ten leading causes of death in the United States, and thus continues to represent a significant public health burden. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell, and a critical cellular element of the immune response to bacterial infections. However, full activation of neutrophils may also cause damage to the host. In a process called “priming,” neutrophils are altered so that their level of activation may be more appropriate to the severity of the bacterial infection. We studied neutrophil priming responses to the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, known to be present in the circulation during serious infections. After 24 hour incubation with low concentration TNF-α neutrophils retained their capacity to be reprimed, whereas 24 hour stimulation with high concentration TNF- α blocked capacity to respond to subsequent stimuli. Better understanding of neutrophil priming and activation during bacterial infections may offer improved therapeutic options.

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Mar 22nd, 12:00 AM

Neutrophil Activation During Bacterial Sepsis: A Finely Regulated Process

Septicemia, a whole-body infection, is among the top ten leading causes of death in the United States, and thus continues to represent a significant public health burden. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell, and a critical cellular element of the immune response to bacterial infections. However, full activation of neutrophils may also cause damage to the host. In a process called “priming,” neutrophils are altered so that their level of activation may be more appropriate to the severity of the bacterial infection. We studied neutrophil priming responses to the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, known to be present in the circulation during serious infections. After 24 hour incubation with low concentration TNF-α neutrophils retained their capacity to be reprimed, whereas 24 hour stimulation with high concentration TNF- α blocked capacity to respond to subsequent stimuli. Better understanding of neutrophil priming and activation during bacterial infections may offer improved therapeutic options.