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Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

DOI

10.17077/1536-8742.2095

Access Restrictions

Full Access Restricted to Subscribers

Abstract

In Cynewulf’s Old English poem Juliana, the saint frames her encounters with her adversaries as pedagogical confrontations, refusing the lessons they attempt to “teach” her and ultimately adopting the identity of a teacher herself. These confrontations depend on three key tropes in the poem: Juliana’s voice, as a material manifestation of language deployed by the saint; her body, both as living body and as relic; and place, especially the place of the saint’s martyrdom and/or burial. Viewed through theories of material feminism, these tropes reveal diverse forms of agency in the poem, as both human and non-human agents make bodies and places newly intelligible as dynamic and interlinking phenomena.

Keywords

Juliana, Cynewulf, Old English, Anglo-Saxon, hagiography, saints, materiality, material feminism, matter, phenomena

Rights Information

Copyright © 2019 Christina M. Heckman

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