Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

8-8-2017

NLM Title Abbreviation

SAGE Open Med Case Rep

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Sage Open Medical Case Reports

PubMed ID

28835822

DOI of Published Version

10.1177/2050313X17721601

Start Page

1

End Page

6

Total Pages

6

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hyperhidrosis can cause dehydration and exercise intolerance. There are several case reports of extremely high sweat rates in athletes. We present as case report of a 17-year-old male with the highest sweat rate recorded in the literature (5.8 L/h). Our goal was to determine if glycopyrrolate, an anticholinergic medication with primarily anti-muscarinic effects that is known to decrease sweat production, would reduce the sweat rate of our subject in a controlled exercise setting.

METHODS: Our patient and a control subject were subjected to an exercise protocol consisting of running on a treadmill (5.4-6.7 mile/h at 1° of incline) in a warm climate-controlled chamber after receiving 0, 2, or 4 mg of glycopyrrolate. Core temperature, heart rate, rater of perceived exertion, and sweat rate were monitored in both subjects.

RESULTS: Glycopyrrolate dose was not significantly correlated with decreased sweat rate and maximal core temperature. However, the clinical effect of reducing the sweat rate was very strong. The improvement of the subject's sweat rate allowed him to successfully return to sport.

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that low-dose glycopyrrolate may be a safe and effective method of controlling exertional hyperhidrosis.

Keywords

OAfund, Hyperhidrosis, glycopyrrolate, thermoregulation, sweat

Journal Article Version

Version of Record

Published Article/Book Citation

SAGE Open Med Case Rep (2017) 5:1-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050313X17721601

Rights

Copyright © 2017 The Author(s)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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URL

https://ir.uiowa.edu/pediatrics_pubs/9