Authors

Douglas Madsen

Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

6-1987

Journal/Book/Conference Title

American Political Science Review

DOI of Published Version

10.2307/1961970

Abstract

A subset of citizens in a democratic system directly test their political self-efficacy by petitioning government for assistance of one kind or another. Drawing on survey data gathered in India in 1967, this investigation focuses on the consequences of success or failure for perceived self-efficacy and for perceived governmetn responsiveness. The analysis demonstrates that (1) successful petitioners come to enjoy a somewhat enhanced sense of self-efficacy but do not view government as particulary responsive, (2) unsuccessful petitioners do not see themselves as inefficacious but--possibly instead--do see government responsiveness in distinctly negative terms, and, (3) the kind of evidence that can help sustain a positive sense of self-efficacy will not suffice to undergird a belief in system responsiveness.

Journal Article Version

Version of Record

Published Article/Book Citation

American Political Science Review, 81:2 (1987) pp. 571-582.

Rights

Copyright © 1987 American Political Science Association. Used by permission. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSR

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URL

https://ir.uiowa.edu/polisci_pubs/43