Document Type

Article

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

8-2002

Journal/Book/Conference Title

The Journal of Politics

DOI of Published Version

10.1111/0022-3816.00148

Abstract

This article studies the effect of direct democracy on the size and diversity of state interest group populations, providing an empirical test of a formal model of how access to the initiative process affects group formation and activities (Boehmke 2000). The model predicts that more groups mobilize and become active in initiative states; this prediction is confirmed by the regression analysis in this paper: direct democracy increases a state's interest group population by about 17%. With an additional assumption, I also generate and test the hypothesis that the increase is disproportionately centered among traditionally underrepresented citizen groups, relative to business and economic groups. This hypothesis is also empirically supported: citizen interest group populations are increased by 29% whereas the increase is only 12% for economic groups, suggesting that direct democracy increases diversity in interest group representation.

Journal Article Version

Version of Record

Published Article/Book Citation

The Journal of Politics, 64:3 (2002) pp. 827-844. DOI: 10.1111/0022-3816.00148

Rights

Copyright © 2002 Southern Political Science Association. Used by permission. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JOP

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URL

https://ir.uiowa.edu/polisci_pubs/67