This conference resulted in the book Feeling politics : emotion in political information processing (Palgrave, 2006). ISBN: 9781403971784.

After many years during which political psychologists have considered affect only in very limited ways and often as an afterthought, new research has begun to examine how affect may be intricately linked to the cognitive system. This work leaves little doubt about the need to understand the role of affect and the emotional processing of information. With the idea that emotions matter, the Shambaugh Conference on Affect and Cognition in Political Action was convened at the University of Iowa, March 7– 9, 2003. This conference brought together a group of scholars with new and exciting research programs designed to better our understanding of the role of affect in politics, while not forgetting that thinking matters as well. Representing a wide range of perspectives, and many different methodologies, this group met, discussed, and argued over several days. The results are presented in this volume.

Invited 2003 Participants

Todd Belt

Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. His research interests include political psychology, public opinion, political behavior, and campaigns and elections.

Kathleen Burns

Graduate student in Psychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and expected to complete her Ph.D. in 2006. Her research interests include social cognition, the relationship between affect and cognition, and stereotyping.

Ann N. Crigler

Professor of Political Science and Director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of of Politics at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on emotions and civic engagement in American politics. Her book, Rethinking the Vote: The Politics and Prospects of American Election Reform was published by Oxford University Press, 2004.

Christopher Ellis

Ph.D. candidate in Political science at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His areas of interest are American Political behavior and the links between public opinion and public policy. His research projects include understanding the role of elite party polarization in shaping mass party coalitions and citizen attitudes toward the major parties.

Nehemiah Geva

Associate Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University. His research interests are in the areas of foreign policy decision and political cognition (perceptions, information processing, and images in politics). Recent work has included the establishment of the Poliheuristic Theory of Foreign Policy (with Alex Mintz), published in their edited volume, Decision Making on War and Peace: The Cognitive Rational Debate and in the American Political Science Review and the development of a cognitive calculus model of political decisions published in the Journal of Conflict Resolution and in International Interactions. His work has also been published in the Journal of Politics and Political Psychology.

Vincent Hutchings

Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and a Research Associate Professor at the Institute for Social Research. His research interests focus on the circumstances under which citizens are attentive to political matters and engage in issue voting. He has recently published a book on this topic entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability (2003), from Princeton University Press. His research also examines the ways in which political candidates structure their political appeals to take advantage of the voters' sympathies and/or antipathies for particular groups along racial, religious, and gender lines. His work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, The American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, Political Communication, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Communication and Legislative Studies Quarterly.

Linda M. Isbell

Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her research, funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Massachusetts, focuses on the relationship between affect and cognition. Her broader research interests include social cognition, political psychology, and sexual harassment.

Marion Just

Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College and an Associate of the Joan Shorenstein Center on Press, Politics and Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. She is a coauthor of Common Knowledge: News and the Construction of Political Meaning and Crosstalk: Citizens, Candidates and the Media in a Presidential Campaign, and co-editor of the recent volume, Rethinking the Vote: The Politics and Prospects of American Electoral Reform.

Luke Keele

Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at Ohio State University. His research interests are at the intersection of American politics and statistical research methods. Specifically, he focuses on macro movements in public opinion, affect in politics, time series, and discrete choice models.

Richard Lau

Professor of Political Science and Director of the Whitman Center for the Study of Campaigns, Elections, and Democracy at Rutgers University, where he has been since 1990. Before coming to Rutgers he taught at Carnegie Mellon University; he was also a fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University for the 2000-2001 academic year. Lau's interdisciplinary research focuses on information processing and voter decision making, the nature of public opinion and its links to political elites, the effects of political campaigns, and health policy. He is also affiliated with the Institute of Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers.

Milton Lodge

Distinguished University Professor of Political Science at Stony Brook University. his primary focus is on experimental studies of the primacy and automaticity of affect toward political leaders, groups, and issues with a special interest in the impact of affect on political judgments and evaluations. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and published in all of the major journals of political science and political psychology.

Michael B. MacKuen

Burton Craige Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research has focused on the way that citizens gather and digest information about politics and the economy as well as on the ways that the broader macro-polity connects citizens, politicians, and public policy in a systemic way. this work has been published in scientific journals including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics. his books include Affective Intelligence and Political Judgment (with George Marcus and W. Russell Neuman, 2000) and The Macro Policy (with Robert Erikson and James Stimson, 2002).

George E. Marcus

Professor of Political Science at Williams College and past president of the International Society of Political Psychology.He is also author of Affective Intelligence and Political Judgmen, with W. Russel Neuman and Michael MacKuen (University of Chicago Press, 2000). He has published numerous articles in the major journals of political science. His recent research continues on the role of emotion in democratic politics.

Victor Ottati

Served as an Assistant Professor at SUNY-Stony Brook (Department of Psychological Sciences), and Purdue University (Department of Psychological Sciences). He is currently an Associate Professor within the Department of Psychology at Loyola University, Chicago. Research interests include social cognition, stereotyping, affect and cognition, attitude formation, persuasion, communication, political psychology, crosscultural psychology, and consumer psychology.

Tasha Philpot

Assistant Professor of Government and African and African American studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She specializes in American Politics with particular emphasis on African American Politics, Public Opinion and Political Behavior, Political Communication, and Political Parties. Her research examines the consequences of using racial images in political communication.

David P. Redlawsk

Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa. His work focuses on voter information processing and the role of emotions in voter decision making. Papers on these topics have been published in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Political Psychology. He is coauthor of the book How Voters Decide: Information Processing During Election Campaigns (Cambridge University Press, 2006) with Richard R. Lau (Rutgers University).

Dawn T. Robinson

Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Georgia, Deputy Editor of Social Psychology Quarterly and Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Social Interaction (LaSSI) at the University of Georgia. She has held elected offices in the American Sociological Association's sections on Social Psychology and the Sociology of Emotions. Her research focuses primarily on identity and emotion processes in face-to-face interactions. She completed a series of National Science Foundation experiments investigating control system implications for interpersonal identity management.

J. Mark Skorick

Tower Fellow with the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. He has taught courses in international relations, foreign policy, and terrorism at Texas A&M and the University of Kansas. He specializes in foreign policy decision making, U.S. foreign policy, and political psychology. He has published papers in the Journal of Conflict Resolution and International Interactions.

Marco R. Steenbergen

Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His areas of interest are political psychology and quantitative methods. His current research projects focus on the role of ambivalence in electoral behavior, the political psychology of deliberation, and elite political behavior. He is the coauthor of Deliberative Politics in Action (Cambridge University Press, 2004) and his articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review,the American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and Political Psychology, among others.

Charles Taber

Associate professor of Political Science at Stony Brook University. Research interests include international relations, political psychology, foreign policy, conflict modeling, and computational modeling (AI). Previous work includes development of a descriptive theory of motivated political reasoning (with Milton Lodge) to account for how and why biased processing can so easily and so often overwhelm teh objective quality of evidence; in particular how it is that both ordinary citizens and political sophisticates are prone to follow a biased course of information processing when forming and updating their political beliefs and preferences. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, and Political Psychology, as well as in edited volumes.

Lisa Troyer

Associate Professor of Sociology at teh University of Iowa. Her research, funded by the National Science Foundation, University of Iowa, and Rockefeller Foundation has included the study of group dynamics with a focus on roles of technology and social expectations on innovation in groups. She directs the Virtual Immersive Social Environments Laboratory (VISE Lab) at the University of Iowa. Previous reports of her research have appeared in Advances in Group Processes and Sociology of Organizations.

Nicholas Valentino

Associate Professor of Communications Studies and Political Science, and Research Associate Professor in the Center for Political Studies, at the University of Michigan. He is interested in the impact of political communication between elites and citizens. Recent work has focuses on "group priming," the activation of group attitudes and identities via new or political advertising during campaigns, the role of emotions in the link between campaign communication, and the salience of group attitudes and identities. His recent research project integrates many of these themes with a study of mass uses of new information technology. He has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Communication Research, and the Journal of Communication, among others.

Christopher Weber

Graduate student in the Department of Political Science at Stony Brook University. His primary research interests include political communication and, more specifically, examining the role of affect in political advertising and deliberation.

Ismail K. White

Assistant Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He studies American politics, specializing in African American politics, public opinion, and political participation. The focus of his research is on the formation of African American public opinion and roles that racialized political messages play in shaping racial divisions in the American public.

Jennifer Wolak

Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests include political psychology, public opinion, and political communication.

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