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Aims & Scope

Addressing the Crisis is an open source journal that takes inspiration from the work of sociologist Stuart Hall. In short, sophisticated essays aimed at a wide audience, authors engage with the complexity of culture and of everyday life, including the historical and contemporary factors that shape social and political relations. We are especially attuned to the urgency of creating critical, diverse, and multi-genre work that takes advantage of the journal’s digital format.

Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Stuart Hall was a Rhodes scholar, influential founder of British and Black cultural studies, and taught at the University of Birmingham UK and Open University. He extended the work of theorists that came before him, those who were his contemporaries, and championed the work of his students and mentees. In honor of Hall’s work, this journal will publish short, interdisciplinary pieces that engage with Hall’s previous writings and his building of infrastructure and we direct those ideas to an educated, mass audience. Multimodal and multi-genre pieces and projects will aim to articulate how Hall’s work remains significant to a broad spectrum of fields.

The genesis of Addressing the Crisis arose from Obermann Center for Advanced Studies comparative ethnic studies working group composed of a critical mass of faculty at the University of Iowa. We were inspired by the role the University of Iowa played in the construction of the often cited and taught book Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies: Stuart Hall. Faculty in history, anthropology, English, African American Studies, American Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Sport Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication, and Communication Studies read Stuart Hall: Political Writings and agreed to think through Hall’s work as it applies to their own research. As leader of the working group, Deborah Whaley began to strategize what form of publication these pieces might take. Tom Keegan, head of the Digital Scholarship and Publishing Studio at the University Iowa, made the brilliant suggestion to create an online journal to house the projects and to create a space of continual publication. Mark Anderson and Alyssa Varner, also of the studio at the University of Iowa, brought the project to life.